Author Archive

Tracking a Decade of Reading: What I’ve Learned

In January 2005, on a whim, I created a spreadsheet with four simple columns: Title, Author, Genre, Month Read. I wasn’t sure I’d keep up with this record, but it seemed worthwhile and was simple to maintain, evolving as I added columns to track other details and eventually migrating the whole thing from Excel

Vulnerable and Dangerous: A Review of On Immunity

On Immunity is as much for people who don’t understand parents who choose not to vaccinate a child as it is for parents who are not vaccinating their kids.

Gender and Power in New Guinea: A Review of Euphoria

"Euphoria" is a story about seizing life and a reminder of the potentially high cost of power and the lasting effects of our choices.

Happy Birthday, Uncle E.

Stuart Little, Wilbur the pig, and Charlotte the spider were born 115 years ago today. Well, their creator was.

Introvert Hosts a TEDx Event

From time to time, I’ve written here about what a great local library we have, but last night certainly topped my library experiences. Perrysburg’s Way Public Library hosted our first ever TEDx event, and I had the honor of being emcee.

3 for Thursday: 3 Reasons World Vision’s Reversal is Nonsense

By now you’ve heard that World Vision U.S. has changed their policy to welcome married gay employ—wait, wait—ok, actually, no, they’re not going to do that, because it turns out they’re conservative, inerrantist evangelicals and always have been and they just forgot that for a second.

The Stranger in the House: A Review of Ten White Geese

In Gerbrand Bakker’s novel Ten White Geese (published in the UK as The Detour), a Dutch woman takes a short-term lease on an old cottage in rural Wales. Avoiding contact with the handful of locals, she does little but sleep, drink wine, smoke, and wander around the property.

“Remember the Thalamus!” A Review of Andrew’s Brain

The narrator of E. L. Doctorow’s new novel is Andrew. Or, more accurately, Andrew’s brain. Or, perhaps most accurately, some consciousness that refers to itself as Andrew. It’s hard to get your bearings in this novel of neuroscience, because Andrew is the ultimate unreliable narrator: he knows that “there is nothing you can think
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