Ancient Science Archive

Where Creationism Goes Wrong

If you’re not a creationist, the temptation might be to finish the title of this post with “on everything.” So go ahead. Say it aloud and you’ll probably feel better. In my recent article, “‘There is a book,’ but Ken Ham has no idea how to read it,” at Toledo Faith & Values (our

Answers in Geocentrism: The Movie

With the announcement that Bill Nye will be debating Answers in Genesis’s Ken Ham next month (February 4), reactions have been very strong. Those (Christian and the non-religious alike) who are not creationists appear to agree with the idea that it is a mistake that will only raise the street cred of AiG and

3 for Thursday: 3 Things to Make Gilgamesh (More) Epic

The Epic of Gilgamesh is a poem that immortalized Gilgamesh, a ruler of Uruk (modern day Iraq) around 2500 BCE. The oldest extant copy (discovered in 1853) of the Epic in Akkadian is from 1800 BCE, though the stories likely pre-date that copy by several hundred years. The oldest recorded human epic, it is

Book Review: The Swerve

The Swerve: How the World Became Modern by Stephen Greenblatt W.W. Norton & Company, 2011 356 pages (Hardcover) Available Amazon Powell’s Some ideas are heralded with the blast of a trumpet and brazenly ushered in, but some are stumbled upon. In Stephen Greenblatt’s (John Cogan University Professor of the Humanities at Harvard University) now

Gallup Poll: Forty-six percent of Americans are creationists

Forty-six percent of Americans are creationists. Just thought I should rip that Band-Aid off right now, particularly since I know that for many, this is a big disappointment. For thirty years we’ve seen the end of tape and the rise of digital. We’ve watched the end of the Space Shuttle fleet and the rise

Opinion: Jesus in orbit?

Does Jesus wave to the International Space Station at his return? Is the horse he’s riding on a funky, but cool space-horse? Last fall I gave a lecture before the student body on the historical contexts behind ancient Christian ideas of the end of the world. My point at that time was that many

Opinion: Copernicus, Interrupted

The final part of my two-part series “Copernicus, Interrupted” is now up at Biologos.org. The series looks at the delay in the reception of Copernican heliocentrism and compares it to the delay evangelicals have in accepting evolution. You can read part 1 here. Today, Protestant students in the classroom may not know Copernicus’ name

Evangelicals who reject heliocentrism?

Part one of my two-part post “Copernicus, Interrupted” is up at Biologos.org. In this post I compare the similarities between seventeenth- and eighteenth-century evangelical resistance to Copernican heliocentrism to that of evangelical resistance to evolution today. The similarities are very interesting. Copernicus’s basic conclusion may be accepted today, but it was a long time
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