Nonfiction Reviews Archive

Vulnerable and Dangerous: A Review of On Immunity

On Immunity is as much for people who don’t understand parents who choose not to vaccinate a child as it is for parents who are not vaccinating their kids.

The Message in the Noise: A Review of Unseen Cosmos

When Karl Jansky observed the first radio waves from space, he gave birth to radio astronomy and changed the way we viewed the universe forever.

Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions: A Review of What If?

Randall Munroe's "What If? Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions" is exactly what it says it is.

The Connection Between Power and Memory: A Review of The People’s Republic of Amnesia

In "The People's Republic of Amnesia," Louisa Lim explores the power of forgetting for control in China and those who won't let Tiananmen disappear.

Why Art and Science are Important Partners: A Review of The Where, the Why, and the How

Both science and art explore the reality of life, and in The Where, the Why, and The How they are an energetic team that connects with the reader with every turn of the page.

How the Past Catches Up to You: A Review of The Map Thief

The Map Thief is the true story of a respected map dealer who turns thief and upturns the world of rare maps in the process.

Is Human Morality Found in Our Primate History? A Review of The Bonobo and the Atheist

In "The Bonobo and the Atheist," Frans de Waal challenges religion's top-down morality and explores the similarities of humans, chimps, and bonobos.

The World You Want or the World You’ve Got: A Review of The Cave and the Light

In the "The Cave and the Light: Plato Versus Aristotle, and the Struggle for the Soul of Western Civilization," Arthur Herman (author of How the Scots Invented the Modern World) introduces the hell out of Plato and Aristotle.
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