Politics Archive

The Connection Between Power and Memory: A Review of The People’s Republic of Amnesia

In "The People's Republic of Amnesia," Louisa Lim explores the power of forgetting for control in China and those who won't let Tiananmen disappear.

3 for Thursday: 3 Lessons from that BuzzFeed Map on your Representative’s Religion

When a BuzzFeed map shows your religion controls the country's power-base, then it's time to stop complaining about persecution.

Why You Should Delete That Crazy Conspiracy Theory on Facebook

Did you double-check the facts behind that conspiracy theory you posted on Facebook? It may be that five minutes of research can disprove the whole thing.

3 for Thursday: 3 Recent Polls Covering Religion and Science

As we draw closer to a presidential election, polls and surveys will go into overdrive, covering everything from religion to science and, well, probably back to religion again.

Beyond the Us-Versus-Them Narrative: A Review of The Undivided Past

In David Cannadine's "The Undivided Past: Humanity Beyond Our Differences," we discover a hopeful narrative which sees cooperation as the defining message of human history.

How a Woman Modernized China: A Review of Empress Dowager Cixi

Pearl Buck once observed that those who hated the Empress Dowager Cixi were “more articulate than those who loved her.” Jung Chang’s recent biography, Empress Dowager Cixi: The Concubine Who Launched Modern China, argues that Cixi has long been misunderstood, and her monumental reforms falsely credited to the men who served her or ruled

3 for Thursday: 3 Religion Surveys You Should Know About

I’m a sucker for a new religion survey, especially when the world of religion appears to be changing fast and data is turned around at the drop of the hat. In the last few weeks, a few important surveys have been released that are shedding important light on the world of religion, especially in

Reviews in the Wild: Reign of Error

A short while back, Mother Jones ran a piece on privatized prisons that keep the money coming in when crime rates are lower. Occupancy rates are written into the contracts, leaving privatized prisons to make deals, including “mandating that local or state government keep those facilities between 80 and 100 percent full. In other
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