Neuroscience Archive

3 for Thursday: 3 Reasons to Question the Existence of the Soul

From split-brain patients to brain-control interfaces, every new scientific discovery appears to be slowly taking away the role and necessity of the soul and giving it to the brain.

That Ghost Is All in Your Head

Ghosts at the movies will always produce box office millions, but in real life, they are merely the special effects of your brain. Here's why.

Reviews in the Wild: The Meaning of Human Existence

Human existence is a complicated one ranging from serving the poor and downtrodden to beheading enemies. But is there meaning it?

3 for Thursday: 3 Crash Courses on The Brain

There was a day when people thought with their hearts. Well, maybe they did not actually think with their literal hearts, but they thought the heart is where the mind could be found...anyway, you get the picture. If neuroscience has demonstrated anything, it is that the brain is where the mind is at today.

“Remember the Thalamus!” A Review of Andrew’s Brain

The narrator of E. L. Doctorow’s new novel is Andrew. Or, more accurately, Andrew’s brain. Or, perhaps most accurately, some consciousness that refers to itself as Andrew. It’s hard to get your bearings in this novel of neuroscience, because Andrew is the ultimate unreliable narrator: he knows that “there is nothing you can think

3 for Thursday: 3 Clues to Understanding Your Brain

In this week's 3 for Thursday, V.S. Ramachandran gives us three clues for understanding the brain. He also demonstrates that we all have Synesthesia.

Why Religion Eventually Leads to Secularity: A Review of Big Gods

"Secular societies climbed the ladder of religion, and then kicked it away," says Ara Norenzayan in Big Gods: How Religion Transformed Cooperation and Conflict. Security breeds secularity. "There are indications that some societies with strong institutions and material well-being may have passed a threshold, no longer needing religion to sustain large-scale cooperation."

The Rise of Neuroexistentialism

Last weekend I reviewed Patricia Churchland’s Touching a Nerve: The Self as Brain, which explores the reality of the brain behind what we know as “the self.” There is a Copernican moment occurring in brain science that raises serious questions about the nature of who and what we are, creating an potential existential crisis
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